Beach metal detecting secrets – look for the Lugworms?

Beach metal detecting secrets – Lugworms could hold the key!

lugwormI have been metal detecting on the beach for many years and in that time I have picked up some great tips and little secrets to increasing my finds on the beach.

All beaches can be different and you need to adapt these secrets to your given beach. With this in mind, here’s an interesting beach metal detecting secret I want to share with you. It will help you find more and it has certainly helped me over the years.

Look for the deep Lugworm
Yes, you read it correctly, ‘look for the deep lugworms’, which give their positions away with their sandy worm casts.

Believe it or not, the beach Lugworm can help you find those deeper and possibly more valuable finds, but How, I hear you ask?

It’s fairly simple but an effective way of finding areas to possibly concentrate on. The dark black sand that lies beneath the soft shifting sands of the upper layers of the beach can be very productive for finds of all sorts. This is because this hard packed dark sand traps finds that have worked their way through the finer upper sands and is usually out of the reach of beach metal detectors. The finds in these darken hard packed sands have also been there for some time, out of the reach of most metal detectors.

This layer of hard dark sand can lay undisturbed for years and only be brought into range of your detector by some of the violent winter storms. They can also be brought into range by the gentle erosion on some beaches which you would not notice if it wasn’t for the humble Lugworm.

Lugworm dig down into the sand and they can give away some clues to the dark dark sand beinglugworm near the surface in the form of worm casts on the beach.

We have all walked along the beach at some point and seen the Lugworm casts that resemble coiled worms made of sand.This is the Lugworm digging down into the sand and pushing the sand out in the form of these coiled casts. The worms don’t stop when they reach the darker sand and as a result the worm cast on the beach show the pushed out sand from these dark layers.

As a result, it gives away the position of the dark, hard packed sand near the surface. Not all beaches have lots of Lugworms or the correct conditions. If the beach does hold a Lugworm population, I would always advise you to keep your eyes open for the signs, and those darker Lugworm casts.

The dark hard packed sand is nearer the surface and could hold some great finds, it will certainly hold the older finds. This is one of my odder metal detecting secrets, but one that has helped on certain beaches.